Hombrés-Kristin-Moore

Kristin Moore, The Public Trust

Kristin Moore, a native Texan, completed her MFA at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles in 2016. Her work explores the landscapes of California, Texas, and the highways in between. Influenced by artists such as Ed Ruscha, Moore explores Americana, pop culture, and nostalgia through the lens of architecture and cityscapes. As a homage to Hollywood, Moore also finds inspiration in the world of film from visionaries such as Ridley Scott, Sophia Coppola, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, and more.

 

She has been named one of Saatchi Art’s 20 Artists to Watch in 2020, and a top 10 finalist in the New Western Talent juried exhibition currently on view with Western Gallery in Dallas. Moore’s paintings can be found in collections across the U.S. and Europe. Her work has been exhibited at The Other Art Fair in Dallas, and in group exhibitions with Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans, the Bolsky Gallery in Los Angeles, and the Yards Collective in New York, among others. She has had solo exhibitions in Los Angeles and Austin. Moore currently lives and works in Dallas, TX, and is a studio artist at The Cedars Union.

https://www.trustthepublic.com/ 

David Yarrow

Artist David Yarrow, Samuel Lynne Galleries

David Yarrow was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1966. He took up photography at an early age and at 20 years old, he found himself working as a photographer for The London Times on the pitch at the World Cup Final in Mexico City. On that day, David took the famous picture of Diego Maradona holding the World Cup and as a result, he was subsequently asked to cover the Olympics and numerous other sporting events. Yarrow refused to be pigeonholed and his interests expanded as he grew into himself. It was only many years later that he found his true comfort zone in documenting the natural world. The last eight years have been career-defining for David.

 

David Yarrow’s evocative and immersive photography of life on earth is most distinctive and has earned him an ever-growing following amongst art collectors. He has an undeniable aptitude for capturing the splendor of what remains wild and free in our world. Yarrow is one of the most relevant and compelling photographers in the world today and has firmly established himself as one of the bestselling fine art photographers of his generation.

 

Yarrow’s work has sold remarkably over the years at Sotheby’s auction house. In 2018, “The Wolf of Main Street” sold for $100,000, which was the highest bid for a piece by a living photographer. Most recently “78 Degrees North” went for an even more impressive $110,000. These statistics reinforce the current value of the rising trajectory of David’s work.

 

In 2016, Rizzoli New York published his book “Wild Encounters” with a foreword written by HRH The Duke of Cambridge (Prince William). The book was awarded “Art Book of 2017” by Amazon. The 2019 release of Yarrow’s second book, also published by Rizzoli Bookstore, is a 268-page photography monograph, which showcases 150 of his strongest images from the past two years. The book features a first-person narrative weaved through the pages, with a foreword written by global NFL star Tom Bray and an afterword written by American cultural icon Cindy Crawford. All royalties from this book will be donated to conservation charities Tusk, in the UK and WildAid, in the US.

 

Philanthropy and conservation are indeed central to Yarrow’s passion to document the animal and human world in a fresh and creative way. Yarrow’s position in the industry has been rewarded with a wide range of advisory and ambassadorial roles. In conservation, he is an ambassador for WildArk and on the advisory board of Tusk. In luxury goods, he was appointed a global ambassador and creative partner for Land Rover in 2017. He is the European ambassador for Nikon and he has recently been integral to the company’s most anticipated camera release of the last decade. He has been appointed as the global ambassador for UBS bank. In December 2017, Yarrow shot LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE, better known as LVMH’s latest campaign with Cara Delevingne. By 2019, Yarrow has firmly established himself as one of the bestselling fine art photographers in the world and his work clearly defines this statement.

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Artist Arno Elias, Markowicz Fine Art

Arno Elias was born in Paris, France. He is a multi-talented musician, painter, and photographer. Arno Elias is known for his compositions of the globally renowned Buddha Bar music. Through his involvement with UNICEF, Arno composed the music for their worldwide campaign with Latin recording artist, Shakira. In his early music career, as a songwriter and singer in France, Arno is the only artist in the history of Buddha Bar to have composed and produced the first original Buddha Bar album titled, “BUDDHA BAR Nature.” Buddha Bar sold millions of his albums worldwide. From 2001 to 2009, Arno produced and composed some of the most significant Buddha Bar classic hits, such as Amor Amor, El Corazon, and Guide Me. Arno Elias was chosen by Brigitte Bardot to compose special music for her Animal Rights “Brigitte Bardot Foundation”, which was created to help protect animals from abuse. His creative talents did not stop at his prodigious musical career that began at an early age, but continued to his artistic career, leading him into the world of painting and photography.

 

Studying the European contemporary artists from the 60’s and 70’s and the American pop art movement inspired Arno. Working alongside Jean Paul Gaultier and Mario Testino in the fashion industry further influenced and informed his creative direction. To date, Arno has exhibited in Miami, Atlanta, Chicago, Paris, New York, Las Vegas, Basel, and Los Angeles. His work has been reviewed in The New York Times, PBS Television, U.S.A. Today, NBC, the Miami Herald, Miami Magazine, Florida International, Haute Living, and the Chicago Tribune. His paintings and photographs have been featured in art fairs throughout North America to include Scope Miami, Scope Basel, Art Chicago, San Francisco Art Mrkt, ART MIAMI, as well as the prestigious Art Basel Switzerland.

 

He was recently commissioned by the St. Regis Hotel in New York City to create two unique works of art for the hotel’s permanent collection. One of which, a mixed media photographic painting of the founder, John Jacob Astor IV, will be prominently featured in the lobby of the prestigious hotel. His artistic sophistication, sense of color and dramatic expression can be seen in his diverse spectrum of artistic creations. In 2007, Arno Elias debuted his contemporary painting collection in the United States in a solo show at Art Features Gallery in the Wynwood District in Miami, Florida and continued shows there for the next few years. PBS produced a documentary piece about Arno that same year showcasing his paintings, his life, and his future plans for solo photographic journeys.

 

Arno was exhibited from 2008 through 2011 in Miami with several solo shows being mounted for Art Basel Miami. Galerie Protee in Paris on the Rue Seine exhibited his work in 2010 alongside French Masters Soulage and Mathieu. During the same time, Keszler Gallery in New York City showed Arno with Banksy and Peter Beard. He then was also seen at the Besharat Gallery in Atlanta in 2010 through 2011 and Lichtfeld Gallery exhibited Arno Elias’ art during Art Basel in Switzerland in June 2011. His work is also exhibited at Markowicz Fine Art in the Design District in Miami.

https://markowiczfineart.com/

Bubba Green Shirt by Jamie Adams

Artist Jamie Adams, Zolla / Lieberman Gallery

“My work functions as a kind of personal memoir, drawing from memory, desire, and dreaming. It’s my response to life, to bear witness, while operating somewhere between private confession and public entertainment. I borrow images from my own personal stash—images of family and friends, cinematic/TV culture from the 1950s and 60s, or other paintings, photos, vintage books. For the last decade in particular the work has mixed aspects of painting with cinema—its personae, projective nature or use of montage, etc… as a way to suggest some kind of complication or disturbance.”

Jamie often gives himself projects. He works similar to how a director works by hiring actors, a crew, etc. His most recent work, Niagara Series, draws from an array of sources including American Luminist and The Technicolor films of the 1950s. He draws aspects of his favorite films from that period into his work, such as Douglas Sirk’s All That Heaven Allows, Hathaway’s Niagara, and Leone’s Once Upon A Time in the West. From a contemporary perspective Technicolor’s overly saturated color in those films seems to embody the anxieties of postwar trauma, and societies striving for conformity, prosperity, peace. In Hathaway’s film Niagara, he essentially takes the ‘Honeymoon Capital of the World’ and turns it into a crime scene. Niagara Falls, recognized as one of the grand, natural wonders on the American landscape, and elevated to iconic status through a multitude of luminous American paintings by Church, Bierstadt, Inness, and others, is transformed into what Adams believes to be the ‘monster’ in the film—the American equivalent to Japan’s Godzilla– a more sublime sense of catastrophe or dread…much more palatable for an American audience.

The earlier jeannie series (2005-2012), was a group of black and white paintings based on a black and white film– Jean-Luc Godard’s French new wave films, Breathless, released around 1960. “I was initially drawn to Jean Seberg’s character in the film, and the wonderful ambient light in her bedroom apartment where monochromatic folds of flesh, and bed sheets and cotton clothing merged into one continuous surface. Jeannie kept changing though. For a while she was everything to me—the reason to make the next painting. It’s because she seemed an empty vessel that I thought I could fill with my own ideas, memories, wishes. And she could play any role–the surrogate, model-mother, furtive lover, ephebic male, the muse, youth…the artist. At the time I wanted to belong to this filmic space; to settle down, set up shop and make something. Initially the painting’s black and white surfaces were suggestive of early film technologies or a painting’s under layer of grisaille. The painted figures, with their curvaceous volumes, additionally began to take on the appearance of Neo-Classical sculpture, semblances of marble statuary.”

Jamie creates paintings based on what he wants to see. For him, it is always a negotiation between idea, the visual experience, and manipulating paint matter. While many of his paintings begin in an organized fashion, they usually slip into chaos. Some characters that begin as one gender sometimes end up burlesquing another; others added are eliminated; scenes come and go. Characters are made to ‘fit’ into the painting. “I construct them in relation to the frame and other elements within it, and as a story reveals itself.  And certain aspects of the body may become accentuated in order to highlight particular qualities: a torque of the hip, iridescence of flesh, a hand gesture, attenuation of the sternal notch or canopy of the chin, etc…I suppose this is my theatrical experiences coming into play….How the painting at a certain point needs to assert itself, make its own demands, project to its own audience. One move affects the need for another and then another and so on.”

https://www.zollaliebermangallery.com/

Deborah Butterfield

Artist Deborah Butterfield, Greg Kucera Gallery

Along with her artist-husband John Buck, Deborah Butterfield divides her time between a farm in Montana, and studio space in Hawaii. She is known for her sculptures of horses made from found objects, like metal, and especially pieces of wood. Butterfield’s work has been exhibited widely and there is demand among art collectors for her sculptures. One of her most prestigious galleries is the Greg Kucera Gallery in Seattle, Washington.

Bronze hasn’t always been Butterfield’s choice of materials. In fact, her earliest works from the mid-1970s were made from sticks and natural detritus gathered on her property in Montana. She explains: “The materials and images were meant to suggest that the horses were both figures and ground, merging external world with the subject. I first used the horse images as a metaphorical substitute for myself–it was a way of doing a self-portrait one step removed from the specificity of Deborah Butterfield.” She began building full-size horses from metal salvaged from scrap yards in the early 1980s. She would sculpt a piece using metal, wood, and other materials fastened together with wire, then photograph the piece from all angles so as to be able to reassemble the piece in metal.

Still using her found object process today, it’s easy to see that the unevenly rusted surface of the found metal work suggests the coloring of types of horses—an appaloosa, chestnut or perhaps a dapple-gray. Butterfield is clearly not obsessed with replicating any aspect of the horse specifically, but in any one of the sculptures, the architectural structure, contour, and mass of the horse are readily apparent. Often, the weighty and crumpled metal pieces used for the shoulders and rump suggest powerful muscles. Carefully choosing from her scrap yard of parts and pieces, she suggests some of the most delicate and surprising aspects of the horse. A massive metal fire escape was twisted into a powerful stallion in a large work that is part of the collection of the Seattle Art Museum. In another work, the curve of an industrial part suggests the neck and mane of the horse in a most uncanny way.

The artist collects metal from wrecked cars, industrial salvage yards, demolished buildings and construction sites and combines them in her Montana studio to create these equine sculptures. Some of the works have utilized three-dimensional letters scavenged from commercial signage bringing an unexpected new element into play. Butterfield has also recently used painted metal from flat signage. Occasionally, recognizable elements such as a child’s tricycle can still be identified within the tangled assemblage of metal parts.

In constructing her horses Butterfield tries to alter the found shape of the metal pieces as little as possible. The separate parts are not often individually important but gain an elegant context in the artist’s ability to meld them into such a suggestive sculpture. She has said that her horses are intended to make a feminist statement. “I wanted to do these big, beautiful mares that were as strong and imposing as stallions but capable of creation and nourishing life. It was a very personal feminist statement.”

Butterfield also creates small sculptures, measuring roughly three feet tall by four feet in length, a size that the artist relates to ancient Chinese ceramic sculptures of the Tang Dynasty. They are not intended to be seen as colts or as baby horses, but as miniatures relating to artworks depicting horses. Butterfield has never been interested in the naturalistic depiction of horses in the common sense of realism in the art world. She prefers that her small works be viewed on pedestals to alleviate any confusion as to her intention regarding the abstract nature of her sculpture.

With works in museums and private collections across the country and around the world, Deborah Butterfield’s work is recognizable. See her most recent works to add to your collection at Art Dallas 2020 in the Greg Kucera Gallery Booth, April 16-19, 2020, at Dallas Market Hall in the Dallas Market Center.

https://gregkucera.com/butterfield_description.htm

Mary Abbott

Artist Mary Abbott, McCormick Gallery

Mary Abbott always felt she was born to lead an artful life. Born in New York City in 1921, she was the great, great, great granddaughter of John Adams, the second president of the United States. Her family was not in politics, but rather her mother, Elizabeth Grinnell, was a poet and Hearst columnist, who clearly supported her artistic daughter’s ambitions.

 

Abbott was interested in art from and early age and studied with painters such as George Grosz at the Art Students League and Eugene Weiss from the Corcoran Museum School. In 1941, Abbott, who was a stunning woman, came out as a debutante at the Colony Club and became the belle of Manhattan. As a working model she appeared on the covers of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, among others. She married and continued painting and studying throughout the War years.

 

In 1946, separated from her husband, Abbott set up a studio on Tenth Street in Manhattan. After meeting Willem de Kooning, whose studio was nearby, she became romantically involved with de Kooning and remained close with him until his death. At that time, she also enrolled in an experimental New York school and worked with founding artists Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, William Baziotes and David Hare. Through these associations Abbott moved into the heart of the New York avant-garde, becoming a member of the Artist’s Club, where she was one of only a few female members along with Perle Fine and Elaine de Kooning. Also in the early 1950’s, Abbott began to exhibit extensively with shows at celebrity galleries, including the Stable Gallery, Kootz, Tibor de Nagy, Tanager, and in three of the famous Stable Gallery Annuals.

 

Abbott and her second husband spent winters in Haiti and the U.S. Virgin Islands where the tropical environment influenced her many beautiful and inventive abstractions. Abbott was always serious about her painting career and declared her life’s work was “using the medium, paint, color and line [to define] the poetry of living space.” In 2016, Abbott was included in the game-changing exhibition, “Women of Abstract Expressionism” organized by the Denver Art Museum.

 

With her death at the age of 98 in August of 2019, she was one of the last survivors of the original AbEx generation. She left behind a legacy of bright, color infused work full of her characteristic sweeping and energetic brushwork. Today Mary Abbott’s work is represented by McCormick Gallery in Chicago.

https://www.thomasmccormick.com/artists/mary_abbott

Muriel Guepin Gallery - Isabelle-Menin_Rome-ou-la-tentation

Artist Isabelle Menin, Muriel Guepin Gallery NYC

Belgian photographer Isabelle Menin creates portraits of flowers that are not only gorgeous in form and color, but also uniquely expressive. Fresh blossoms and withering blooms melt into each other in dreamy washes of color and hazy drips and swirls. Hues and flowers are reflected in pools of water, as forms disintegrate and reappear in trickles and indistinct glimmers of light. The resulting images are breathtaking interplays of light and shadow, form and reflections, and breathtaking colors and textures.

 

Looking at Menin’s vibrant and organic work, it isn’t surprising to learn that she has a background in painting. After exploring working with paint while developing a career as a graphic designer for over a decade, the artist turned to digital photography. Taking pictures, scanning pieces of nature, she constantly plays with textures and colors, transforming them, mixing them, in order to give shape to a fictional nature, dense and flamboyant at the same time. With rich colors, bold textures, and a stunning abstract quality, her creations look more like masterful illustrations and paintings than conventional photographs.

 

The complex outcome of every artwork is due to the digital manipulation that Menin loves using to transform and blend her images in order to create her beautifully moody works. As she explains: “Going digital allowed me to push back my limits, to find a much wider sphere of activity where things tied up fluidly and were reversible. I create a space that unfolds through the depth I get by accumulating layers, by light, by transparency and opacity; I put elements together that create a kind of fake landscape, I photograph and then manipulate them in order to twist them and show the sometimes hidden sides.”

 

Menin calls her work “inland photographs and disordered landscapes” in reference to the strange complexity of nature, which reminds her of human complexity. She says, “The uncontrolled forces, the shapes’ complexity, the inter-weavings and the synergy of the elements, they all look to me like a mirror of human spirit. We are not straight lines, we are like nature, a very large network of interferences that work together to produce something which sometimes looks accomplished and then gets destroyed in a perpetual coming and going between order and disorder.”

 

In the past five years, Isabelle Menin has had numerous exhibitions in Europe and internationally, both at art fairs and museums. Isabelle Menin lives and works in Brussels, Belgium, and is represented by the Muriel Guépin Gallery.

http://www.murielguepingallery.com/artists/isabelle-menin

Daniel Sprick - Souls in Purgatory

Artist Daniel Sprick, MM Fine Art

Colorado artist, Daniel Sprick’s subjects range from extraordinarily realistic portraits to hauntingly contemplative still lifes. His paintings, while reminiscent of the Dutch and Flemish tradition, are wholly contemporary, subtly blurring the line between realism and abstraction. His paintings feature a range of subjects, from still lifes of flowers and unlikely assortments of objects to interiors and urban and pastoral scenes. A diverse range of men, women, and youth populate his portraits and figurative works; taken together, they reflect a rich and encompassing view of humanity. The meticulous representation of everyday objects and stirring interpretation of the human form provide viewers a new way to look at the world.

 

As Timothy J. Standring, exhibition curator and Gates Foundation Curator at the Denver Art Museum explains Sprick’s work: “Upon first glance, viewers might think Daniel’s works are photographs because of their stunningly realistic elements. However, the longer we look at one of his paintings, the more we become aware that they are anything but a part of our world. We encounter Sprick’s paintings not so much as statements, but more as experiences, whereby we engage deeply with his creativity.”

 

​Born in 1953 in Little Rock, Arkansas, Sprick currently lives and works in Denver, CO. Sprick and his work have been the subject of museum shows, including the Museum of Outdoor Art in Englewood, Colorado; the Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, Tennessee; the Evansville Museum of Art and Science, Indiana; and the Denver Art Museum. Sprick’s work is represented in numerous public collections, among them the Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock; the Denver Art Museum; and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. An articulate spokesman about the nature of art and his own work, Sprick is the subject of a recently released PBS documentary.

Daniel Sprick is represented by MM Fine Art in Southampton, New York.

http://www.mmfineart.com/sprick-daniel.html

Renoir's Curtain by Gene Davis

Artist Gene Davis, Vallarino Fine Art

Gene Davis was born in Washington, D.C. in 1920 and spent nearly all his life there. While he is most famous as an American abstract painter, painting lively compositions of thin, vibrantly colored vertical stripes, before he began to paint in 1949, he worked as a sportswriter, covering the Washington Redskins and other local teams. Working as a journalist in the late 1940s, he covered the Roosevelt and Truman presidential administrations, and was often President Truman’s partner for poker games.

 

Davis considered his nonacademic background a blessing that freed him from the limitations of a traditional art school orientation. His early paintings and drawings—though they show the influence of such artists as the Swiss painter Paul Klee and the American abstractionist Arshile Gorky—display a distinct improvisational quality. His preference for spontaneity and fascinated by color relationships, Davis delighted in alternating thin bright vertical stripes to create syncopated patterns reminiscent of jazz and bebop. Despite their calculated appearance, Davis’s stripe works were not based on conscious use of theories or formulas. Davis often compared himself to a jazz musician who plays by ear, describing his approach to painting as “playing by eye.”

 

In the 1960s, art critics identified Davis as a leader of the Washington Color School, a loosely connected group of Washington, D.C. painters who created abstract compositions in acrylic colors on unprimed canvas. Their work exemplified what the critic Barbara Rose defined as the “primacy of color” in abstract painting. And while he took up abstract painting in the 1940s as a hobby, and was featured in a few local shows, he was never successful enough to devote his full time to art until, after 35 years in journalism, he finally turned to it 1968.

 

“The idea of my ever making a livelihood out of painting was the farthest thing from my mind,” he said in a 1981 interview. But he hit on something—a parade of brightly-colored, edge-to-edge stripes—that not only made his name and changed his career, it put him at the forefront at the only major art movement to emanate from the nation’s capital, the Washington Color School.

 

In contrast, Davis experimented with complex schemes that lend themselves to sustained periods of viewing. Davis suggested that “instead of simply glancing at the work, select a specific color and take the time to see how it operates across the painting.” In discussing his stripe work, Davis spoke not simply about the importance of color, but about “color interval:” the rhythmic, almost musical, effects caused by the irregular appearance of colors or shades within a composition. Davis is known primarily for the stripe works that span twenty-seven years, but he was a versatile artist who worked in a variety of formats and media.

 

In keeping with his unorthodox attitudes, Davis’s works do not follow in an orderly sequence. Davis described his method as “a tendency to raid my past without guilt, going back and picking up on some idea that I flirted with briefly, say fifteen or twenty years ago. I will then take this idea and explore it more in depth, almost as if no time had elapsed between the present and the time of its original conception.” As a result, similar works may be separated by years or even decades. Davis’s works, which resonate with his romantic, free-wheeling approach to art-making, reveal a seriousness balanced by whimsy and an unpredictability that is always a source of joy.

 

In 1972 Davis created Franklin’s Footpath, which was at the time the world’s largest artwork, by painting colorful stripes on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the world’s largest painting, Niagara (43,680 square feet), in a parking lot in Lewiston, NY. His “micro-paintings”, at the other extreme, were as small as 3/8 of an inch square.

 

A lifelong Washington, D.C. resident, Davis died in his hometown on April 6, 1985, and his work is included among the collections of important institutions, such as the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, and The Phillips Collection and Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. Today, his work is represented by Vallarino Fine Art in New York City.

http://www.vallarinofineart.com/modern#/gene-davis

Libra Season by Anthony White

Artist Anthony White, Greg Kucera Gallery

Anthony White is an artist and curator in Seattle, Washington, where he is currently represented by Greg Kucera Gallery. He is a recent alumnus of Cornish College of the Arts, the first in his family to complete four years of professional training. White’s work consists of intricate portraits, still lifes, and objects meticulously spun from common PLA plastic. His work disrupts hierarchies of status and wealth by placing trivial souvenirs and low-brow accoutrements in luxurious environments.

 

White has recently received the 2019 Special Recognition Award from the Seattle Art Museum’s Betty Bowen Award committee, and was the 2018 recipient of the second place AXA XL Catlin Art Prize juried by prominent international museum curators, at the New York Academy of Art, in New York. He was the COSA 2019 Award recipient, and recently presented a Solo Presentation booth at EXPO Chicago 2019. White completed his Spring ‘19 PLOP residency in London, UK, where he returned for a solo exhibition, “Black Friday” at Public Gallery in December 2019. All of which are in conjunction with a museum curatorial project that will launch in June of 2020. During the 2019 Seattle Art Fair, the Frye Art Museum acquired work by Anthony White, as did the Crocker Art Museum at EXPO Chicago 2019 to add to their permanent collections.

 

Anthony White was born in 1994 in Santa Maria, a small town outside of Santa Barbara, California. He attended middle and high school, in Prescott Valley, AZ. Both places played different roles in his subcultural exposure and identity development. However, in Arizona, the young White found an undertone of disapproval towards anything that wasn’t right-wing and stereotypically normal. Prevailing societal roles and the predictable confines of gender and sexual identity politics fought against his confidence in presenting his true identity and expressing his genuine interests.

 

His working-middle class parents, Tyra, (an elementary school teacher) and Gilbert, (a lowrider car mechanic) were supportive and encouraged his farfetched and wild dreams—-even gifting him a tattoo machine on his 15th birthday. His younger brother and sister, have been supportive as well. White grew up around his grandmother, who was a craft artist building benches and chairs with a vast collection of low-craft accoutrements, which he believes was the initial influence toward his interest in pursuing an education at Cornish College of the Arts. He is the first in his family to complete four years of school and professional training.

Things To Teach Yourself by Anthony White

Things To Teach Yourself by Anthony White

 

His intricate collage-like ‘paintings’ are created from threads of colored PLA plastic–often found in throwaway consumer goods and luxury products alike–which are heated, melted and used to fill in his erratic still life compositions. Each creation is crammed with references to pop culture and the hallmarks of everyday life, no matter the socioeconomic class. Household items are scattered around Versace and Balenciaga pieces. Diamonds and bundles of cash sit alongside power tools and hot sauce. What underpins his work, though, is the use of cultural symbols that are somehow recognizable to us all.

 

In a recent Creative Review interview, he explained, “The work is both very time and labour intensive. I often forget the exact hours I spend on each piece after they exceed 100, but I enjoy the process, and I do think it is important to slow down, and really highlight and explain each part within each work through the time I spend on it. Each piece has a basic contour drawing done first, for technical reasons, but a lot of the line direction and color and figurative elements are intuitive–they have to be.”

 

See his most recent works at Art Dallas 2020 in the Greg Kucera Gallery Booth, April 16-19, 2020, at Dallas Market Hall in the Dallas Market Center.

https://gregkucera.com/white-anthony.htm